Music

June 18, 2010

Portsmouth Institute Conference on Newman: Edward Elgar

The Friday evening concert at last week's Portsmouth Institute conference on Newman is well worth a listen.

Posted by Justin Katz at 2:00 PM

May 30, 2006

Conservative Billy

John Miller has added another 50 to his list of conservative pop/rock songs. In the second set, he includes Billy Joel's "Angry Young Man," but if we're going to allow Billy into the mix, a long-time fan would be remiss in not pointing the way to "Vienna" — one of the best and, not coincidentally, most temperamentally conservative songs ever written. The music, of course, complements, but the lyrics speak to the conservative soul.

Posted by Justin Katz at 7:21 PM

September 28, 2005

Out Beyond Expectations

David Wilcox and Nance Pettit's new CD, Out Beyond Ideas, puts to music mystic poetry from multiple religious traditions. My review, of sorts, suggests that they've uncovered and enhanced commonalities that underlie human societies, and that conservatives should look past the too-obvious backstory of the project to commonalities that ought to underlie our own.

Posted by Justin Katz at 5:59 AM

March 16, 2005

Songs You Should Know 03/15/05

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "The Video Store Song" by Victor Lams.

"The Video Store Song" Victor Lams, Pop/Rock
Stream (HiFi) Download
from Robot Love

Posted by Justin Katz at 6:16 AM

March 8, 2005

Songs You Should Know 03/08/05

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Eve's Lament" by Rosin Coven.

"Eve's Lament" Rosin Coven, Arthouse Rock
Stream (HiFi) Download from Menagerie

Posted by Justin Katz at 6:06 AM

March 1, 2005

Songs You Should Know 03/01/05

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Starlight Ship" by You.

"Starlight Ship" You, Alternative Rock
Stream (HiFi) Download from Freedom from the Known.

Posted by Justin Katz at 6:09 AM

February 22, 2005

Song You Should Know 02/22/05

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Life in Pictures" by Dan Lipton.

"Life in Pictures" Dan Lipton, Pop/Rock
Stream (HiFi) Download from Life in Pictures

Posted by Justin Katz at 9:35 PM

February 16, 2005

Songs You Should Know 02/15/05

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Once Upon a Time" by Joe Parillo and Christine Harrington.

"Once Upon a Time" Joe Parillo and Christine Harrington, Jazz/Classical
Stream (HiFi)
from Sand Box

Posted by Justin Katz at 11:31 PM

February 8, 2005

Songs You Should Know 02/08/05

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Scared" by Mr. Chu.

"Scared" Mr. Chu, Hard Rock
Stream (HiFi) Download

Posted by Justin Katz at 3:00 PM

February 1, 2005

Songs You Should Know 02/01/05

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Not a Great Man" by Victor Lams. With Terri Schiavo recently in the news again, Victor's song from her husband's creepy perspective is certainly a timely reminder.

"Not a Great Man" Victor Lams, Pop/Rock
Stream (HiFi) Download

Posted by Justin Katz at 3:14 PM

January 25, 2005

Songs You Should Know 01/25/05

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Skydivin" by Rosin Coven. "Feels like I'm skydivin every single moment of my life." Yup, that sounds about right.

"Skydivin" Rosin Coven, Arthouse Rock
Stream (HiFi) Download from Menagerie

Posted by Justin Katz at 6:21 PM

January 18, 2005

Songs You Should Know 01/18/05

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Johnathon Livingston Seagull" by You. A quirky song from an eclectic band that somehow puts a dent in the bitter cold of winter.

"Johnathon Livingston Seagull" You, Alternative Rock
Stream (HiFi) Download from Freedom from the Known.

Posted by Justin Katz at 9:35 PM | Comments (1)

January 11, 2005

Song You Should Know 01/11/05

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Neon" by Dan Lipton.

"Neon" Dan Lipton, Pop/Rock
Stream (HiFi) Download


Posted by Justin Katz at 7:34 PM

January 7, 2005

Friday's Important Stuff: Topical Pop Lyrics Analysis and Christian Contemplation

In correspondence related (in part) to his early impressions of the new U2 CD, How to Dismantle the Atomic Bomb, Paul Cella indicated that the stem-cell research theme of the song "Miracle Drug" mightn't be as obvious as I'd thought. As it happens, this song first caught my attention during my two weeks of rattling around in a truck delivering Christmas packages, so I had plenty of time to break my rule about over-interpreting pop song lyrics, which are, in this case, as follows:

Miracle Drug

I want to trip inside your head
Spend the day there
To hear the things you haven't said
And see what you might see

I want to hear you when you call
Do you feel anything at all?
I want to see your thoughts take shape
And walk right out

Freedom has a scent
Like the top of a new born baby's head

The songs are in your eyes
I see them when you smile
I've had enough I'm not giving up
On a miracle drug

Of science and the human heart
There is no limit
There is no failure here sweetheart
Just when you quit

I am you and you are mine
Love makes nonsense of space
And time... will disappear
Love and logic keep us clear
Reason is on our side, love

The songs are in your eyes
I see them when you smile
I've had enough of romantic love
I'd give it up, yeah, I'd give it up
For a miracle, a miracle drug, a miracle drug

God I need your help tonight

Beneath the noise
Below the din
I hear a voice
It's whispering
In science and in medicine
"I was a stranger
You took me in"

The songs are in your eyes
I see them when you smile
I've had enough of romantic love
I'd give it up, yeah, I'd give it up
For a miracle, a miracle drug

Miracle, miracle drug

It's conceivable that I'm not thinking of something, but it seems to me that a song blending science, medicine, miracle drugs, and newborn babies is likely about embryonic stem-cell research, and that's the framework within which I set about understanding it. Now, given his politics, the obvious extra-textual assumption is that Bono would support embryonic stem-cell research. Indeed, a Google search for "stem cell bono u2" brings up a reference to his attendance at the Democrat National Convention, where that position dominated the rhetoric. On the other hand, the religious references and the inclusion of baby imagery suggest an opening for the opposite position.

So what's Bono's position? More importantly, what's the song's position? Although I can't satisfactorily answer that question, given the lyrics themselves as well as the musical trajectory, I'd suggest that the song doesn't seek to lay out an answer, but rather to convey an internal narrative of the debate.

"Miracle Drug" begins with reference to a "you" who is apparently animate, but whose consciousness, if it exists at all, is trapped in an expression-denying prison: "I want to see your thoughts take shape/And walk right out." With Alzheimer's being a disease frequently mentioned in the stem-cell debate, it would seem a likely candidate for Bono's intended affliction.

In this context, freedom's having a scent "like the top of a new born baby's head" could have two meanings, both shades of an argument in favor of the research:

  1. The thing that could provide freedom is somehow redolent of babies.
  2. The freedom from disease should have no less an emotional tug than the pleasant olfactory associations we have with newborns.

Opponents of embryonic stem-cell research may tend to assume that any reference to babies in this debate is automatically in their favor, but that's not necessarily the case. Some people on the other side really do understand the science involved and its implications, but they come to different conclusions nonetheless. Their attribution of value differs. And Bono's subsequent appeal to the "song" and "smile" in the eyes of this "you" could be taken as an assertion of the drowning personhood of the sufferer.

The next stanza seems to cinch this interpretation: the only failure, when it comes to "science and the human heart," is quitting. The next stanza, however, is a jumble of concepts — accentuated by the mid-thought elision of sentences, grabbing the object of one sentence as the subject for the next. (Would it be too generous to U2 to wonder whether this moment associates those having the debate with those afflicted with Alzheimer's?)

"I am you and you are mine" sounds almost as if the narrator is addressing his cells, or perhaps a clone dehumanized in "therapeutic cloning." The narrator then declares that love removes the coherence of the measures of material reality (space and time). Then, following the ellipsis, "love and logic" are functioning together, which echoes (to my ear) religious writers' insistence that a foundation of faith does not indicate a lack of logic. When we get to the assertion that "reason is on our side, love," the question is nearly tangible: Whose side?

With the repeat of the chorus, "had enough/I'm not giving up" becomes "had enough of romantic love/I'd give it up." Frankly, I can't get the "romantic love" piece to fit in the puzzle. Is it an oblique reference to procreation, making the chorus a retreat to the emotional desire for stem-cell cures? Is the initial "you" a romantic love interest of the narrator, whom the narrator is now willing to give up to death for a "miracle drug" of a more spiritual, salvational sort?

The devolution of the music into an echo-laden morass at this point doesn't help to clarify. The more straightforward interpretation is that it represents the narrator's intellectual turmoil; it could also be a mechanism to signal that we're shifting viewpoints to that of the sufferer. In the latter case, "God I need your help tonight" could just be the patient's request that God spur human society toward the "miracle" of embryonic stem-cell cures. I prefer the former possibility, so I'll proceed in that direction.

The plea to God is the narrator's, and he is asking for help sorting through the various moral claims. Directly following the line, the guitar bursts forth its most piercing scream of the song, and the marching rhythm of the lyrical bridge evokes a sense of clarity... unfortunately, ambiguity persists, even within a biblical reference. The clarifying voice that the narrator hears "in science and in medicine" could either be speaking through science and medicine or from within them, as an ethical appeal, perhaps, or maybe from science and medicine's victims.

Regarding what the voice — apparently Jesus — actually says (Matthew 25:35), one could take it to mean that the embryos destroyed for the research are "strangers," in whom we are called to see Jesus even though they may be difficult to recognize as our brothers. (Indeed, that the unborn are among the "least brothers of mine" is a standard Christian pro-life argument.) On the other hand, these being pop-song lyrics, Bono could have been pointing, again obliquely, to the next verse, "[I was] ill and you cared for me," skirting the difficulty of rhyme.

I'm very wary of attributing too much effort to the artistic endeavors of rock stars. And I can only hope that it does not sound implausible for me to claim that I expended so much effort of my own for interpretation because it was fun. Still, whatever its deliberateness or its intellectual conclusion, the song captures very well — musically and lyrically — the difficulty of living according to that paragraph of scripture, particularly as science and medicine progress.

Now if Bono would kindly email me to let me know what he was thinking, I can go on with my life...

Posted by Justin Katz at 1:30 PM | Comments (2)

January 4, 2005

Songs You Should Know 01/04/05

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "One Day in January" by Joe Parillo and Christine Harrington.

"One Day in January" Joe Parillo and Christine Harrington, Jazz
Stream (HiFi)
from Sand Box

Posted by Justin Katz at 12:06 PM

December 28, 2004

Divine Inspiration in the Arts

One of my fortunate discoveries, this fall, after I'd come to the stunning revelation that not all music with an explicitly Christian message is saturated with a trying-too-hard unctuousness, was Who We Are Instead by Jars of Clay. A review by Mark Joseph that I'd read in early August was absolutely glowing, and it ended by pointing to another revelation:

Among these [fans], ironically enough, is U2's front man Bono, who recently noted, "I've had their version of the song 'Jesus' Blood Never Failed Me Yet' in my car for a year now, and you know what — it never has failed me yet."

Not surprisingly, given my past, I'd never heard U2 described in a Christian context before I began sifting through the Christian neighborhoods of the blogosphere, but apparently the theme has been there all along.

In the time since I read Joseph's review of Jars of Clay, the more-famous of the two bands has released what is being declared its "most conspicuously Christian record," and I can't help but wonder if there's been a Christian music equivalent of what the business folks call "upward management." Is the mainstream, commercial success of such bands as Creed, Sixpence None the Richer, and Jars of Clay beginning to make it acceptable again for pop/rock stars to express their faith? To come out?

That may or may not be the case, but the possibility does indicate a damaging bifurcation of faith and public life that has spread across more aspects of society than music. In a review of a previous album by Jars of Clay, Mark Joseph noted the band's fight to be treated "in the category that describes their music (pop/rock), not the category that describes their faith (gospel)." For too long, now, there has been religion and there has been culture, and one could fully integrate with one by becoming a stranger to the other.

That reality detracts from both aspects of our society, and it would be a mistake to see it as the work of only one side. Doug Giles describes the issue from the other angle:

Since God is the self-existent Lord of the universe and accountable to no one, he could have made the world in which we live completely beige. He could have been a minimalist who only shops at West End. He's God and can do what he wants. Instead, God dumped a lot of unnecessary splendor on us, expressly for our enjoyment. And you know what ... this freaks out the altar-call-driven, number-crunching, pragmatic, no-taste Church-goer because it seems that such expenditure is a waste of time, space and energy.

It sounds oversimple to say it, but at least part of life's purpose is to live, and arts and culture enhance that experience. The opposing reflection of this truism is that arts and culture lose their force without meaning and lose their coherence when disengaged from philosophy. Religion and culture oughtn't be kept distinct any more than they ought to be self-consciously melded. Each is ubiquitous in a person's life, and if we return to the practice of peering through life where they overlap most visibly, we will surely bring about a renaissance in the decades to come.

Posted by Justin Katz at 6:00 PM | Comments (1)

Songs You Should Know 12/28/04

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Gegwsi" by Mr. Chu.

"Gegwsi" Mr. Chu, Hard Rock
Stream (HiFi) Download from Chu's Next

Posted by Justin Katz at 2:29 PM

December 21, 2004

Songs You Should Know 12/21/04

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "So Simple a Song" by Victor Lams. Sometimes this song just hits the spot, brightening the morning.

"So Simple a Song" Victor Lams, Pop/Rock
Stream (HiFi) Download
from Robot Love

Posted by Justin Katz at 8:38 AM

December 14, 2004

Songs You Should Know 12/14/04

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Queen of November" by Rosin Coven. This song is from the band's new CD, Menagerie. I'm still intending to find time to write a very complimentary review of this CD; it isn't for everybody, but if you've a taste for darkly artsy songs, be sure to have a listen and take a look.

"Queen of November" Rosin Coven, Arthouse Rock
Stream (HiFi) Download

Posted by Justin Katz at 12:22 AM

October 12, 2004

Songs You Should Know 10/12/04

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Little Man" by You.

"Little Man" You, Alternative Rock
Stream (HiFi) Download

Posted by Justin Katz at 4:25 PM

October 6, 2004

Song You Should Know 10/05/04

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Didn't Know It Rhymed" by Dan Lipton.

"Didn't Know It Rhymed" Dan Lipton, Pop/Rock
Stream (HiFi) Download


Posted by Justin Katz at 12:15 AM

September 28, 2004

Songs You Should Know 09/28/04

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "David Melech" by Mozaik. The band calls its sound "psychedelic jewgrass," and one needn't listen long to understand the reason for the unique category. If you're in the mood for something different, give "David Melech" a listen, and maybe even pick up a copy of Beyond Words from Confidence Place.

"David Melech," Mozaik, Psychedelic Jewgrass
Stream (HiFi) Download
from Beyond Words

Posted by Justin Katz at 6:33 AM

September 1, 2004

Songs You Should Know 08/31/04

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Sand Box" by Joe Parillo and Christine Harrington.

"Sand Box" Joe Parillo, Jazz
Stream (HiFi)
from Sand Box

Posted by Justin Katz at 9:59 AM

August 24, 2004

Songs You Should Know 08/24/04

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Nonchalant" by Mr. Chu.

"Nonchalant" Mr. Chu, Hard Rock
Stream (HiFi) Download from Chu's Next

Posted by Justin Katz at 8:44 PM

August 17, 2004

Songs You Should Know 08/17/04

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Farmer Joe" by Victor Lams. This song even has a cartoon video!

"Farmer Joe" Victor Lams, Pop/Rock
Stream (HiFi) Download
from Robot Love

Posted by Justin Katz at 1:34 PM

August 10, 2004

Songs You Should Know 08/10/04

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Train (A Vague Hunger)" by Rosin Coven. This song is from the band's new CD, Menagerie. I still hope to write a review in the near future, but suffice, for now, to say that I'm simply amazed that people of my general age range write such musically compelling pieces. If you've a taste for darkly artsy songs, be sure to have a listen and take a look.

"Train (A Vague Hunger)" Rosin Coven, Arthouse Rock
Stream (HiFi) Download

Posted by Justin Katz at 11:13 AM

August 3, 2004

Songs You Should Know 08/03/04

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "The Greatest Imagination" by me. Although I post it only because I'm up in the rotation (which I hope to expand once I've got my life under control), this song, recorded only as a rough demo, might be among my best-written. (Here's a JPEG of the lyric page from my demo CD.) Its first draft was penned on a napkin at a strip club near Giants Stadium in New Jersey. Something about the easily discerned false promises of a strip club sparked a few of my better lyrics during those college-dropout years. And while writing this song, I learned a lesson about life beyond the strobe lights; sitting at a corner table, scribbling away, I began to attract the attention of the strippers, who came over asking to see what had distracted me from their bare chests. I offered to show them... for $20 (the going price of a lap dance).

"The Greatest Imagination" Justin Katz, Pop/Rock
Stream (HiFi) Download

Posted by Justin Katz at 11:00 AM

July 27, 2004

Songs You Should Know 07/27/04

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Smile on Me Surfman" by You.

"Smile on Me Surfman" You, Alternative Rock
Stream (HiFi) Download

Posted by Justin Katz at 10:51 AM | Comments (1)

July 21, 2004

Songs You Should Know 07/20/04

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Keychain" by Dan Lipton. Even if you never take the time to listen to a Song You Should Know, make time for this one; it's my favorite from a truly fantastic CD.

"Keychain" Dan Lipton, Pop/Rock
Stream (HiFi) Download


Posted by Justin Katz at 11:22 AM

June 29, 2004

Songs You Should Know 06/29/04

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Hasidic Surf" by Mozaik. The band calls its sound "psychedelic jewgrass," and one needn't listen long to understand the reason for the unique category. If you're in the mood for something different, give "Hasidic Surf" a listen, and maybe even pick up a copy of Beyond Words from Confidence Place.

"Hasidic Surf," Mozaik, Psychedelic Jewgrass
Stream (HiFi) Download
from Beyond Words

Posted by Justin Katz at 10:31 AM

June 22, 2004

Songs You Should Know 06/22/04

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Song for J.W." by Joe Parillo and Christine Harrington.

"Song for J.W." Joe Parillo, Jazz
Stream (HiFi)
from Sand Box

Posted by Justin Katz at 12:26 PM | Comments (3)

June 15, 2004

Songs You Should Know 06/15/04

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Long Way Home" by Mr. Chu.

"Long Way Home" Mr. Chu, Hard Rock
Stream (HiFi) Download

Posted by Justin Katz at 7:05 AM

June 8, 2004

Songs You Should Know 06/08/04

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Captain Bigshot, Pt. 1" by Victor Lams.

"Captain Bigshot, Pt. 1" Victor Lams, Pop/Rock
Stream (HiFi) Download
from Robot Love

Posted by Justin Katz at 7:11 AM

June 7, 2004

The Opportunities for New Concepts Online

From the maker of that intriguing Samarost Flash game that made the Internet rounds a few months ago comes a new game called Quest for the Rest. It's only got three levels, but the more interesting innovation of the thing is that it's intended as a promotional tool for the pop/rock band The Polyphonic Spree. Hey, if I've got money when the CD comes out in July, the game might have gained the band a customer.

Makes me wish I had the time to do more toward learning Flash than periodically intending to plan to pick up the thick book that I've got teaching the program! Other bloggers are more knowledgable about the ins and outs of the marketing world, but I think Flash games would be a great way to introduce potential customers to pretty much any form of independent artist, or even artisan, whether their trades involve music, literature, or visual works.

When I've periodically dreamed of acting like a businessman, I've thought to hire Ferry Halim to design one of his beautiful games for Timshel Arts, or for some specific work in the future. You know... someday.

(via Shiela Lennon)

ADDENDUM:
Incidentally, I'm aware that large companies — and major productions (e.g., the Harry Potter movies) — have already hit upon the idea of using Flash games for promotion. However, to my experience, they are so focused on getting the promotional message across that they undermine the strengths of the medium.

In the game mentioned above, the Flash designer and the band are essentially on an equal level. The designer was free to express his own style and to run with an idea that was only thematically connected to the band in a superficial way. ("Help the three lost members reunite with the rest of their group...") In this model, the client gives a purpose to the game, but the designer gives the game its ability to ride the waves of Internet preferences and word of mouth.

Posted by Justin Katz at 1:42 PM

June 1, 2004

Songs You Should Know 06/01/04

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Eve's Lament" by Rosin Coven. This song is from the band's new CD, Menagerie. I hope to write a review in the near future, but suffice, for now, to say that I'm simply amazed that people of my general age range write such musically compelling pieces. If you've a taste for darkly artsy songs, be sure to have a listen and take a look.

"Eve's Lament" Rosin Coven, Arthouse Rock
Stream (HiFi) Download

Posted by Justin Katz at 5:01 PM

May 25, 2004

Songs You Should Know 05/25/04

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Crazy Child" by me.

"Crazy Child" Justin Katz, Pop/Rock
Stream (HiFi) Download

Posted by Justin Katz at 7:03 AM

May 18, 2004

Songs You Should Know 05/18/04

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Clams" by You.

"Clams" You, Alternative Rock
Stream (HiFi) Download

Posted by Justin Katz at 7:00 AM

May 11, 2004

Songs You Should Know 05/11/04

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Never Thought" by Dan Lipton. As always, I cannot recommend the CD from which this song comes, Life in Pictures, enough — if you like musically intelligent, slightly quirky pop/rock music. To find out more, read my review, click Dan's name, or give "Never Thought" a listen.

"Never Thought" Dan Lipton, Pop/Rock
Stream (HiFi) Download

Posted by Justin Katz at 7:10 AM | Comments (1)

May 4, 2004

Songs You Should Know 05/04/04

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Gimple the Fool" by Mozaik. The band calls its sound "psychedelic jewgrass," and one needn't listen long to understand the reason for the unique category. If you're in the mood for something different, give "Gimple the Fool" a listen, and maybe even pick up a copy of Beyond Words from Confidence Place.

"Gimple the Fool," Mozaik, Psychedelic Jewgrass
Stream (HiFi) Download
from Beyond Words

Posted by Justin Katz at 7:08 AM

April 27, 2004

Songs You Should Know 04/27/07

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Manic" by Joe Parillo and Christine Harrington.

"Manic" Joe Parillo, Jazz
Stream (HiFi)
from Sand Box

Posted by Justin Katz at 6:57 AM

April 20, 2004

Songs You Should Know 04/20/04

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Scared" by Mr. Chu.

"Scared" Mr. Chu, Hard Rock
Stream (HiFi) Download

Posted by Justin Katz at 8:05 AM

April 13, 2004

Songs You Should Know 04/13/04

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "The Video Store Song" by Victor Lams.

"The Video Store Song" Victor Lams, Pop/Rock
Stream (HiFi) Download
from Robot Love

Posted by Justin Katz at 7:19 AM

April 6, 2004

Songs You Should Know 04/06/04

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Bed for Blossom" by Rosin Coven.

"Bed for Blossom" Rosin Coven, Arthouse Rock
Stream (HiFi) Download
from Penumbra

Posted by Justin Katz at 7:07 AM

March 30, 2004

Songs You Should Know 03/30/04

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "A Look at Us" by me.

"A Look at Us" Justin Katz, Pop/Rock
Stream (HiFi) Download

Posted by Justin Katz at 6:52 AM

March 23, 2004

Songs You Should Know 03/23/04

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "She" by You.

"She" You, Alternative Rock
Stream (HiFi) Download

Posted by Justin Katz at 7:10 AM

March 16, 2004

Songs You Should Know 03/16/04

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Needy" by Dan Lipton. As always, I cannot recommend the CD from which this song comes, Life in Pictures, enough — if you like musically intelligent, slightly quirky pop/rock music. To find out more, read my review, click Dan's name, or give "Needy" a listen.

"Needy" Dan Lipton, Pop/Rock
Stream (HiFi) Download

Posted by Justin Katz at 7:41 AM

March 10, 2004

Songs You Should Know 03/09/04

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Sabbath Prayer" by Mozaik. The band calls its sound "psychedelic jewgrass," and one needn't listen long to understand the reason for the unique category. If you're in the mood for something different, give "Sabbath Prayer" a listen, and maybe even pick up a copy of Beyond Words from Confidence Place.

"Sabbath Prayer," Mozaik, Psychedelic Jewgrass
Stream (HiFi) Download
from Beyond Words

Posted by Justin Katz at 10:44 PM

March 3, 2004

Songs You Should Know 03/02/04

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Filling in the Blanks" by Joe Parillo and Christine Harrington. This whimsical piece from a cross-genre jazzy classical album seemed a great way to start up the practice of picking a weekly song, after over a month's lapse.

"Filling in the Blanks" Joe Parillo, Jazz
Stream (HiFi)
from Sand Box

Posted by Justin Katz at 1:31 PM

February 10, 2004

Songs You Should Know 02/10/04

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Nonchalant" by Mr. Chu.

"Nonchalant" Mr. Chu, Hard Rock
Stream (HiFi) Download
from Chu's Next

Posted by Justin Katz at 2:38 PM

February 3, 2004

Songs You Should Know 02/03/04

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Sarah's Lullaby" by Victor Lams.

"Sarah's Lullaby" Victor Lams, Pop/Rock
Stream (HiFi) Download
from Robot Love

Posted by Justin Katz at 3:16 PM | Comments (2)

January 27, 2004

Songs You Should Know 01/27/04

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Bittersweet" by Rosin Coven.

"Bittersweet" Rosin Coven, Arthouse Rock
Stream (HiFi) Download
from Penumbra

Posted by Justin Katz at 12:15 PM

January 20, 2004

Songs You Should Know 01/20/04

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Too Good to Be True" by me.

"Too Good to Be True" Justin Katz, Pop/Rock
Stream (HiFi) Download

Posted by Justin Katz at 12:00 PM

January 13, 2004

Songs You Should Know 01/13/04

The Timshel Music Song You Should Know this week is "Cool Hair" by You. Just go ahead and try not to crack a smile when you listen to this song, especially if you're familiar with the serious musicianship of the band's other material.

"Cool Hair" You, Alternative Rock
Stream (HiFi) Download

Posted by Justin Katz at 11:20 AM